Curtain design – Abajo El Telon http://abajoeltelon.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:03:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abajoeltelon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Curtain design – Abajo El Telon http://abajoeltelon.com/ 32 32 What is a gazebo? | WSYR https://abajoeltelon.com/what-is-a-gazebo-wsyr/ Tue, 17 May 2022 16:29:59 +0000 https://abajoeltelon.com/what-is-a-gazebo-wsyr/ Which gazebos are the best? You may have heard people talking about it or maybe you have seen them, but you still wonder, what is a gazebo? Or maybe you know the basics but would like to learn more. A gazebo is an outdoor structure that provides shade and protection from the elements. You can […]]]>

Which gazebos are the best?

You may have heard people talking about it or maybe you have seen them, but you still wonder, what is a gazebo? Or maybe you know the basics but would like to learn more.

A gazebo is an outdoor structure that provides shade and protection from the elements. You can buy them in a range of styles, shapes and sizes. Once you know more about them, it’s easier to find the right one for you.

What is a gazebo?

A gazebo is a freestanding garden structure that is open, rather than having fixed walls or sides like a shed or summer house. The main function of a gazebo is to provide shade and shelter when you are outdoors.

Although they are often square or rectangular, you can find hexagonal, octagonal gazebos and other similar shapes. They come in two main varieties: hardtop and soft-top.

Hard top gazebos

As the name suggests, hardtop gazebos have roofs made of hard materials. Most often, their awnings are made from metal or some type of hard plastic, such as vinyl. They are sturdier than the soft top varieties, but they are also much more expensive.

Gazebos of this type take a long time to set up and take down, so they are designed to be permanent or semi-permanent. They can either be concreted into the ground as a permanent structure or anchored with dowels or screws if you wish to be able to move them.

Soft top gazebos

Soft top gazebos have canopies made from sturdy UV resistant fabric that is naturally waterproof or has a waterproof coating. They are more affordable than the hardtop versions, but not as durable.

They are usually meant for temporary use, either for a day or a week at a time or all summer long. Some soft-top gazebos have collapsible frames, making them even quicker and easier to set up and take down.

What are gazebos used for?

Now you know what gazebos are, but you may still be wondering what they are for. These are some of the most common ways to use gazebos.

  • Shadow: If your garden does not have much natural shade, you will be able to sit more comfortably and longer in the shade of a gazebo.
  • Shelter from the rain: It’s frustrating when it’s warm enough to enjoy your garden but it’s raining. However, with a gazebo, you can enjoy the fresh air while staying dry.
  • Avoid bugs: Many gazebos have mosquito nets, so you can spend time outdoors without worrying about insects.
  • Grill under: With their open sides, gazebos can be safely grilled and can be used on rainy days or to provide shade in hot weather.
  • Jacuzzi: Gazebos are ideal covers for hot tubs, providing shade and shelter from rain or snow.

How to choose the right gazebo

Consider the size

You can choose from a wide range of sizes, ranging from under 10 feet by 10 feet to over 14 feet by 20 feet. Consider how many people you want to fit under your gazebo and the size of your outdoor space. You don’t want a gazebo to absolutely overshadow a small yard or look comically small in a large yard.

Decide if you want a permanent or temporary structure

Do you want shelter just for the summer months or are you looking for something more permanent that you can enjoy all year round? Your answer to this question will determine which type of gazebo is right for you: hard top for permanent or long-term use or soft top for short-term use.

Think about the materials

Gazebos usually have metal frames, although some inexpensive models have plastic frames and some high-end versions have wooden frames. Roofs can be fabric, metal, plastic, or even wood shingles. Choose durable materials if you want your gazebo to last for years to come.

Watch out for the side panels

Although gazebos do not have fixed sides, some have removable side panels or curtains that can be drawn around the edges. Some curtains are made from mesh to keep bugs out while maintaining airflow, while others are made from stronger fabric to help block wind and rain.

Best gazebos

Best Choice Products Hardtop Gazebo

Lightweight yet durable, it’s made with an aluminum frame and a UV-resistant tinted plastic roof. It measures 10 feet by 10 feet, which is large enough to accommodate a group without overwhelming your yard. Sold by Amazon

Purple Leaf Hardtop Permanent Gazebo

Purple Leaf Hardtop Permanent Gazebo

This sturdy hardtop gazebo is intended to be concreted into the ground as a permanent garden structure. It is available in four sizes between 10 feet by 14 feet and 12 feet by 18 feet. Sold by Amazon

Kozyard Alexander Hardtop Aluminum Permanent Gazebo

Kozyard Alexander Hardtop Aluminum Permanent Gazebo

With an aluminum frame and steel top, this is a very durable gazebo choice available in sizes between 10ft by 12ft and 12ft by 20ft. Double curtains have a mosquito net layer that you can use independently of the opaque fabric layer. Sold by Amazon

Best Choice Products Outdoor Portable Pop Up Gazebo

Best Choice Products Outdoor Portable Pop Up Gazebo

Taking just minutes to pop up and set, it’s a great choice for occasional use or impromptu garden get-togethers. It folds up relatively small so you can take it camping or on a day trip. Sold by Amazon

Instant Pop-Up Cool Spot Gazebo Tent

Instant Pop-Up Cool Spot Gazebo Tent

This stylish pop-up gazebo has a vented roof and mosquito net curtains to keep insects at bay. It is available in six colors, including beige, blue and red. Sold by Amazon

Large terrace gazebo

Large terrace gazebo

Measuring 10 feet by 13 feet, it’s relatively spacious for a soft-top gazebo. The sturdy frame is made of iron and the canopy and curtains are made of high quality fabric. Sold by Amazon

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Lauren Corona writes for BestReviews. BestReviews has helped millions of consumers simplify their buying decisions, saving them time and money.

Copyright 2022 BestReviews, a Nexstar company. All rights reserved.

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‘The Chinese Lady’ review: A captivating TimeLine piece imagines the inner life of a teenage girl showing her culture to American audiences https://abajoeltelon.com/the-chinese-lady-review-a-captivating-timeline-piece-imagines-the-inner-life-of-a-teenage-girl-showing-her-culture-to-american-audiences/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:32:00 +0000 https://abajoeltelon.com/the-chinese-lady-review-a-captivating-timeline-piece-imagines-the-inner-life-of-a-teenage-girl-showing-her-culture-to-american-audiences/ The woman known as Afong Moy, the title character of playwright Lloyd Suh’s ‘The Chinese Lady’, was the first Chinese woman to set foot in North America. Or at least, that’s how it was announced. Afong Moy was the name given to a teenage girl brought from Guangzhou to New York in 1834 by American […]]]>

The woman known as Afong Moy, the title character of playwright Lloyd Suh’s ‘The Chinese Lady’, was the first Chinese woman to set foot in North America. Or at least, that’s how it was announced.

Afong Moy was the name given to a teenage girl brought from Guangzhou to New York in 1834 by American traders, who exposed her to paying customers who wanted a glimpse of something exotic – a living artifact of the Orientalism of the 19th century, nestled in the center of a room filled with other products from its homeland.

For each visiting audience, she demonstrated a tea ceremony, ate with chopsticks, and walked around the room on her traditionally bound feet. A Chinese man known as Atung served as his attendant and translator. We’re told Afong Moy’s performance initially garnered an admission price of 25 cents for adults, 10 cents for children.

Virtually nothing is known about the actual woman who was billed as “The Chinese Lady,” including her first name, her family of origin, or what became of her once the paying crowds dwindled. The project of Suh’s double multilayer is therefore to grant him an imaginary interior life.

We are introduced to Afong Moy shortly after her arrival, aged 14, as she runs through a version of her act. As Atung (Glenn Obrero) opens a silk curtain, Afong (Mi Kang) reveals herself within the red-hued walls of what she calls “the room.” (The beautifully detailed, diorama-like set, designed by Arnel Sancianco, holds a few surprises.)

Glenn Obrero plays Atung, an attendant and translator for Afong Moy.

This young Afong is curious and optimistic, as delighted to encounter the unknown contours of America as to represent China to her audience. And in Suh’s carefully constructed conceit, the audience she addresses is both the onlookers of 1834 and the theatergoers of 2022.

The Afong and Atung on stage before us are not bound by linear time. Afong can exist as a teenager in the 1830s while referencing the Opium Wars of the decades to come, though she happily adds that she will learn none of this, sheltered from the events of the world.

Afong ignores the artificiality of this theatrical logic as no stranger than the distorted portrayal of Chinese life she is forced to portray multiple times a day: “My whole life is a performance.”

And it allows young Afong to comment on cross-cultural affairs with sharp hope. She dreams of returning home to China with a 14-year-old white American in tow, to be exposed as she was here. And she is stunned by the grotesque obsession with her feet, when America has its own brutal customs. “Like corsets,” she says as an example. “Or the transatlantic slave trade.” Unhindered by language barriers, she is intelligent, ironic and poetic in her conversation with us; Was it the limits of translation or empathy that flattened white American perceptions of her into little more than decorative clothing and tea sets?

The years pass in larger and larger chunks as each new scene begins, and Afong’s enthusiasm fades with each reopening of the curtain. As America’s Chinese population becomes grist for westward expansion in building the transcontinental railroad, and later targeted for racialized terrorism and lynchings, Afong apologizes. If only she had been a better ambassador, she thinks, things could have been different.

Suh’s screenplay charts a tricky trajectory, but director Helen Young steers this TimeLine Theater Company production with ease around the tonal curves. The play demands a lot from its two actors. Obrero finds impressive nuance in Atung’s shifting feelings for Afong, but the production hinges on Kang’s massively charming performance.

A transplant from Seattle, where she has recorded credits with many of that city’s top theaters, Kang is completing an MFA in acting at Northwestern this spring; “The Chinese Lady” marks her professional Chicago debut, and it’s a stunner.

When Suh’s artifice-breaking ending forces Kang to speak in his own voice, we’re more than willing to respect his authority. The message? There is a difference between looking and seeing.

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Tennessee students pitch business proposals to ‘Shark Tank’ | Tennessee News https://abajoeltelon.com/tennessee-students-pitch-business-proposals-to-shark-tank-tennessee-news/ Sat, 14 May 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://abajoeltelon.com/tennessee-students-pitch-business-proposals-to-shark-tank-tennessee-news/ By DAVID McGEE, Bristol Herald Courier BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) — One by one Tuesday afternoon, about a dozen fifth graders from Holston View Elementary walked through a curtain into a dimly lit room and presented their best product to a steely-eyed panel with many questions. This marked the opening day of the Holston View version […]]]>

By DAVID McGEE, Bristol Herald Courier

BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) — One by one Tuesday afternoon, about a dozen fifth graders from Holston View Elementary walked through a curtain into a dimly lit room and presented their best product to a steely-eyed panel with many questions.

This marked the opening day of the Holston View version of “Shark Tank” 2022, featuring the popular TV show’s theme music. The project was the creation of fifth grade teachers Jill Berthold, Diana Bush and Victoria Lamkin.

“We started this a few years ago when Mrs. Bush went to a goal-based learning session,” Berthold said. “This group of children received a rubric and were fired. These projects are their inventions and innovations — they are all theirs. It meant something to them.

Products featured included everything from a “smart” softball and a special football air pump to a picture frame that displays photos from a smart phone, a tray to organize injured essentials or the elderly, a jacket with a solar panel to keep the wearer warm, a cool pillow, and a device to draw or sketch on a tablet or computer and project the image onto the ceiling.

political cartoons

Student Jackson Walden went so far as to display his “magno ball” basketball design on the t-shirt he wore.

Jackson said his biggest lesson was the confidence he gained while giving his presentation.

“When we started I thought I would do horrible. But after presenting, I thought I had done very well,” he said.

The students were tasked with creating a product idea, designing a prototype to show off and developing their entire presentation, which includes a money request and a business plan, Berthold said.

“They worked on real-life skills. Public speaking, making eye contact, writing thank you notes… It’s something we don’t do every day, but we can include all subjects: math, science, language arts and social studies. . You’ve seen these topics included all day today.

Two rounds were held on Tuesday and two more were held on Thursday. All students have been graded.

“We grade them on their work ethic. The work ethic is big these days and these kids gave 110% and they deserve to get a grade for that,” Berthold said. “Normally it’s something we do after testing. It’s still after testing, but we can note it because it includes all of our basic core courses.

The school’s first “Shark Tank” project took place in 2017, Bush said.

“The first year we started small with six local sharks, but now we’re up to 34 famous sharks,” Bush said.

Nearly 60 students participated and 34 “sharks” from the community, including local businesses, restaurants, shops, real estate executives, CEOs, IT supervisors, government employees, agency founders nonprofits and successful business owners from the major Tri-Cities.

“I feel like we’ve expanded the presentation, the creation, the elaboration of how prototypes are created – and the rigor of it. They can be asked any kind of questions and they have to be ready to answer,” Bush said. “We were so impressed that the students who are usually our silent students in class really come to life and show what they are capable of.”

“As an adult, I don’t think I could do what they do. I can teach children, but being in front of adults is difficult,” Berthold said. “And they don’t know who they’re presenting to; that’s another intimidating factor… It’s not like giving a presentation in front of professors. They are presenting in front of someone they have never met before. It takes a lot.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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In the shadow of a Cornish castle, a vegetarian feast for Beltane https://abajoeltelon.com/in-the-shadow-of-a-cornish-castle-a-vegetarian-feast-for-beltane/ Wed, 11 May 2022 22:15:32 +0000 https://abajoeltelon.com/in-the-shadow-of-a-cornish-castle-a-vegetarian-feast-for-beltane/ In the summer of 2018, while vacationing in Cornwall, South West England, Frieda Gormley and Javvy M. Royle, the married founders of British interiors brand House of Hackney, fell on the castle of Trematon, whose gardens were open to the public. for the season. Upon entering the nine-acre estate of the Norman motte and bailey […]]]>

In the summer of 2018, while vacationing in Cornwall, South West England, Frieda Gormley and Javvy M. Royle, the married founders of British interiors brand House of Hackney, fell on the castle of Trematon, whose gardens were open to the public. for the season. Upon entering the nine-acre estate of the Norman motte and bailey structure, which was built by Robert, Earl of Mortain, in 1068 after the Battle of Hastings, they were immediately charmed. The formal grounds accented with palm trees and acanthus blossoms that surround the house on three sides give way to apple orchards and wild forests that slope down to a stream, and lawn at the top of the hill, the couple could see the River Lynher and, beyond, the port city of Plymouth.

To the west of the castle mound stands a nine-bedroom Georgian mansion, its stucco facade crowned with the same cog-shaped battlements as the medieval curtain wall from which it was partly assembled, after sections of the fortification to improve the view. Known as Higher Lodge, the house was built on the site of the castle hall and chapel of the original property in the early 19th century. There is also a swimming pool whose Mogul pavilion was salvaged from Rajasthan and, in the circular keep, a fairly large chicken coop. “It was wildly romantic, like an otherworldly English fairy tale,” says Gormley.

Three days later, coincidentally, after the couple returned to east London, a friend called to gauge their interest in taking over the same estate, which had belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall since 1337 (the estate was created by Edward III to give independence to his heir, Prince Edward, and later the monarch’s eldest son, and is currently managed by the Prince of Wales), as the last occupants – English landscapers Isabel and Julian Bannerman – sought to end their tenure as guardians. Without ever having set foot there, Gormley, 41, and Royle, 45, agreed. “We just thought, ‘How bad can this be?'” she said. Since moving in with their two children, Javi, 13, and Lila, 10, three years ago, the couple have made it their mission to revive the neo-classical interior of the house, by restoring the floor-to-ceiling sash windows and stripping the walls of layers of history before covering them again with their own wallpaper designs, which are modern takes on the flocked patterns synonymous with the English Arts and Crafts movement .

In fact, the house doubles as an unofficial showroom and office of sorts (the official one has, since March of this year, been housed in St. Michael’s, a Victorian Gothic church and clergy house in the East London) for House of Hackney, which they started in 2011, after Gormley, a former fashion buyer, failed to find the kind of richly decorative and playful naturalistic prints she wanted for their home Victorian at London Fields. It has since expanded to paint, furniture, rugs and clothing. “Our homes have always been our muses,” she says. Their stay in Trematon gave rise to the Trematonia print, which mimics an age-old tapestry decorated with Celtic foliage and mythical beasts and Phantasia, a pattern awash with dragons and mushrooms – and inspired them to run a bedroom of guests move out of the house during the month of August (they are taking a year off to spend the summer with their children, but plan to reopen it next year; the entire house can still be rented through Unique Homestays).

But their interest in ecology is more than aesthetic. “Being in this corner of the world, seeing the seasons change and really following the cycle of nature, reinforces your connection to the environment and the desire to protect it,” says Gormley. So Royle has started tending to the home’s now organic vegetable garden, planted with broccoli, kale, peas and purple zucchini, and is in the process of transforming the former walled garden. with heritage fruit trees and a small solar power plant. Plus, since the couple stopped using chemicals and applied the no-dig cultivation method, they’ve seen new levels of vitality in plants, as well as nesting slowworms, butterflies and even swifts. along the remaining castle walls.

On a recent spring day, Gormley and Royle hosted a small gathering at home, bringing together some of the friends they’ve made since moving to Cornwall to celebrate Beltane, an ancient Celtic festival of fire that falls mid -way between spring and summer. . Guests included chef and regenerative farmer Dan Cox; Daze Aghaji, climate justice activist and creative director of online platform Earthrise; medical herbalist Harriet Coleman; Dom Bridges, the founder of the Haeckels skincare and natural fragrance line; Catherine Chong, climate economist and co-founder of Farms to Feed Us, which connects UK consumers with small, sustainable food producers; Tim Williams, a New Zealand-born soil expert; and his wife, Claire Williams, a gardener, cook and, with her husband, a promoter of regenerative agricultural practices throughout the region. “We didn’t expect to meet such kindred spirits,” Gormley says of the group, which has developed its own cyclical economy and shares everything from food to furniture to Old Spot pigs.

By noon, everyone had gathered in the kitchen to chat and drink coffee while Claire and Cox, a former executive chef of Fera at Claridge’s in London and L’Enclume in Grange-Over-Sands, put the touches finale to a vegetarian feast they had prepared. using ingredients from nearby Crocadon Farm, a 120-acre regeneration site in St. Mellion that the two friends run with Tim. The dishes were then presented in the form of a buffet on the large marble preparation table and, after having filled their plates, the guests took their places at the long oak table in the room, decorated with jugs filled with the poet’s narcissus flowers which Gormley had cut that morning.

The spread included a Garden of Eden torta, or baked vegetable omelet, filled, in this case, with kale, wild garlic, fennel, chervil, and Comté cheese; roasted Sombra squash served with sautéed chard, capers, fermented cucumber and sorrel leaves; and a salad of Carolus potatoes and Russian red kale with miso mayo and sautéed three-corn leeks. Much of the food was so fresh it barely left the floor. “We dug them up yesterday,” Cox said, pointing to the Jerusalem artichokes, some roasted, some mashed, which came with lovage, ribwort plantain leaves and fava beans. For drinking there was Ripe, an organic cider made with otherwise unwanted organic apples picked from Cornish orchards.

In part, the meal was a way to test out potential dishes for The Granary, a cafe and event space Cox will open with the Williams at Crocadon Farm this summer. (Later, they plan to add a full-fledged farm shop and restaurant.) Not that guests had many reviews. As they ate, they talked about issues surrounding greenwashing, whether it would be possible to make charcoal from the towering holm oaks on the property, and the progress of the portable “chicken hotel” that Tim currently built on the back of an unused trailer. Eventually, a Sweet Clover, Bloody Butcher Corn, and Black Bee Honey cake dressed in calendulas appeared, along with steaming cups of Spring Equinox tea, a custom blend of nettle, cleavers, dandelion leaf, and of Plantago designed by Coleman. Dessert was followed by a walk around the gatehouse ruin and across the meadow, allowing the group to enjoy the splendors of the natural surroundings which continue to bring them together. Below, Gormley and her guests share tips on how to throw your own seasonal party.

Bring sunshine to the table

No guest arrived empty-handed. Coleman, who grew up in a Somerset home that adhered to certain pagan practices, baked Sunny Bread, an age-old recipe passed down from his mother. “Paganism is a seasonal way of life, and certain foods mark certain seasons,” says Coleman. “This bread is all about the return of the sun in the Celtic calendar.” The sun, on the other hand, is associated with the harvest and one of the main ingredients of bread, honey, represents the richness of nature.

Keep the setting simple

Gormley dressed the table with a crisp white tablecloth made by House of Hackney in collaboration with Lancashire heritage linen producer Peter Reed, matching napkins embroidered with the brand’s HOH monogram and a vintage set of Blue Asiatic Pheasant ceramics from Burleigh. “We wanted it to be fresh and harmonious, just as we tried to do with the kitchen as a whole, so you could feel the serenity of the garden shine through,” says Gormley. Indeed, the room’s restrained palette of greens and whites complements the garden, rather than distracting with lots of conflicting colors or patterns. “Simplicity is important,” says Gormley. “The table should be a place where you can think.”

Light up everything

Despite inclement weather, Gormley still managed to pay homage to Beltane by skilfully playing with natural light. He danced on the crisp white table linens, and she set down and lit a log fire, using fallen logs picked up after winter storms, at the open hearth in the kitchen. For more brilliance, she drew on the collection of old candelabra she acquired over the years, placing a large silver specimen set with verdant forest green candles at the end of the table.

Be creative with your ingredients

“We wanted to be ingenious,” says Cox. When the beans he and Claire were hoping to pair with the roasted Jerusalem artichokes weren’t yet ripe, they used the flowers and tops instead. “The tops are gorgeous and taste amazing — they have this sweet, almost fragrant flavor,” says Cox. According to him, being open-minded in your approach allows you to use whatever is truly in season. Lunch was also filled with foraged foods, from garlicky nettles to ribgrass plantain leaves. Normally fodder for cows, this grass, which grows in Crocadon pastures, adds a touch of fungus. “You may have an idea of ​​what you want to cook, but until you go out and see what’s ready to harvest, nothing is set in stone,” says Cox. “The earth is full of surprises.”

Don’t waste, don’t want

Not only did Cox and Williams incorporate whatever seasonal ingredients they had on hand, but they tried to use as many as possible. Rather than throwing away the skins of the artichokes, for example, they created what’s known as choke chips: after carefully rubbing the whole artichokes, Cox roasted them in a deep box with a thin layer of water in the bottom which he covered with foil, until they were softened but still al dente. Once cooled, he cut them in half and carefully removed the skins from the pits, spreading them on a baking sheet which he placed back in a low oven for a few hours. After that, he lightly fried them in hot oil and seasoned them with sea salt. As Cox says, “It takes extra effort, but it’s so worth it.”

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Reception in honor of the potter as a living treasure https://abajoeltelon.com/reception-in-honor-of-the-potter-as-a-living-treasure/ Tue, 10 May 2022 07:04:23 +0000 https://abajoeltelon.com/reception-in-honor-of-the-potter-as-a-living-treasure/ Elsewhere in entertainment, events and the arts: Honor a “treasure” The Arkansas Arts Council will honor his 2022 Arkansas Living Treasure, Hot Springs Potter James “Kimbo” Dryden, at a reception, 2-4 p.m. May 20 at the Hot Springs Convention Center, 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. Free entry. “Kimbo Dryden is a compelling addition to our […]]]>

Elsewhere in entertainment, events and the arts:

Honor a “treasure”

The Arkansas Arts Council will honor his 2022 Arkansas Living Treasure, Hot Springs Potter James “Kimbo” Dryden, at a reception, 2-4 p.m. May 20 at the Hot Springs Convention Center, 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. Free entry.

“Kimbo Dryden is a compelling addition to our Living Treasure program,” said Stacy Hurst, secretary of the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism, in an April press release announcing the selection. “His lifelong passion, dedication, and mastery of pottery not only added to his family’s legacy, but Arkansas’s legacy.”

The Living Treasure program annually recognizes an Arkansan “who excels in creating a traditional craft or folk art and who preserves and advances their craft through community outreach and teaching others”, according to the press release. An independent jury made the selection.

More information about the award is available by calling (501) 324-9348 or on the Arkansas Arts Council website, arkansasarts.org. More information about Dryden is available by visiting the Arkansas Arts Council blog page, tinyurl.com/2tjwhy26.

Small jobs

Arkansas Arts Council “Small works on paper” exhibition, featuring 2D artwork no larger than 18 by 24 inches by artists from Arkansas, is on display through May 31 at the River Valley Arts Center, 1001 E. B St., Russellville, with a opening reception from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday. Admission to the center and reception is free. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call (479) 968-2452 or visit rivervalleyartscenter.org.

Recovery through the arts

Philips County is one of nine communities participating in a national initiative to address covid-19 recovery and community wellbeing through the arts, according to a press release from the National League of Cities and One Nation One Project. Other communities have responded creatively to the “There’s no place like home” prompt: Chicago; Gainesville, Florida; Utica, Miss.; Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in partnership with Forsyth County; Providence, RI; Rhinelander, Wis.; Harlan County, Kentucky; and Edinburgh, Texas.

Plural mural

The Arkansas Arts Council has partnered with the Downtown Little Rock Partnership and the Cutwell 4 Kids Association to create a mural in downtown Little Rock in a free virtual workshop. Cutwell 4 Kids Founder, Anthony Tidwell, will host a free virtual “how to paint a mural” workshop, from 10 a.m. to noon on June 6, covering equipment, design, and application. Entrants will submit their designs to the Downtown Little Rock Partnership, which provides space at Eighth and Main streets for a community-built mural. Tidwell will also lead and provide hands-on instruction to volunteers as they hand off their chosen design during a community paint day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., June 11. Call (501) 324-9348 or email scarlet.sims@arkansas.gov.

Bard Partnership

A reconstructed Arkansas Shakespeare Theater, the state’s only professional Shakespeare company, returns after a two-year covid-caused hiatus to stage William Shakespeare’s comedy “Much Ado About Nothing,” at 7:30 p.m. June 23-24 and June 30 June and July 1 and 2 p.m. June 25 at the Bridges Larson Theater, Snow Fine Arts Center, University of Central Arkansas, 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. Tickets are $20; visit tinyurl.com/4mzf3vhk.

The summer festival, which began in 2007 but was canceled in 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic, now partners with the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville “to capitalize on the phenomenal talent and existing resources within the state by taking advantage of the [UA’s] graduate students in performance and design as well as talented teachers,” according to a press release. “While the two-year hiatus was a huge disappointment, it also gave us the opportunity to reflect, reinvent and build new relationships,” Shauna Meador, the theater’s executive producer, said in the statement.

The play will be on stage June 16-18 at Fayetteville University’s Global Campus Theater. Curtain times and ticket information will eventually be published on uarkartstickets.com.

Sean Clancy contributed to this roundup.

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Canal House / Studio Farris Architects https://abajoeltelon.com/canal-house-studio-farris-architects/ Sun, 08 May 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://abajoeltelon.com/canal-house-studio-farris-architects/ Canal House / Studio Farris Architects ©Koen Van Damme + 24 Share Share Facebook Twitter pinterest WhatsApp To post Or https://www.archdaily.com/981528/canal-house-studio-farris-architects © Martino Pietropoli Text description provided by the architects. A small residence fits with originality among the houses overlooking the Brussels-Escaut maritime canal which divides the small town of Humbeek, part of the municipality […]]]>

Canal House / Studio Farris Architects

©Koen Van Damme

© Martino Pietropoli© Martino Pietropoli© Martino Pietropoli© Martino Pietropoli+ 24